Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Keeping it Fresh

Happy Wednesday All! Time for another Blog Chain round. Kate started today's round with this topic:

As a reader and/or a writer what are some of your favorite fiction tropes? Are you sucker for secretly in love with best friend type
stories, stories set in mysterious boarding school stories, stories that contain time travel, or something else entirely? As a writer how
do you try to give the tropes you tackle in your own books a fresh spin?

Hmm....this is a hard one for me. I am not certain that I have a "favorite" really. I like all types of stories, YA and adult.
That said, I do rush to my local bookstore for Dan Brown's novels. And I will almost always pick up a James Patterson, Libba Bray, Cassandra Clare, or John Green novel. What do those books have in common? Writing I enjoy, stories I can loose myself in, and impeccable research to make their storylines believable.

The second part of the question deals with me as a writer. For the most part, I actually don't think about originality with my stories, as much as I focus in on authenticity. I don't know, maybe I am naive enough to fervently believe that if I am being authentic in the story and with my characters, I will also find a original voice or spin on the tropes being deal with in the book.

I attended a great workshop with Amy Koss once. She had was do an exercise in which we told our partner the opening premise of our books and asked the partner to complete the premise. If they could, we were probably being cliche. It was a great exercise and I know it opened a lot of eyes in the room.

Anyway, that is my spin on today's topic. Come on back tomorrow for a little news.

For more on this topic, check out Sandra's from yesterday, and Katrina's post tomorrow.


  1. I like that exercise. I'm sure it would open up a lot of possibilities--more than I had with that premise.

  2. Complete the Premise sounds like a really great game. Kinda scary, though. What if they can do it?! :) Looking forward to your news tomorrow, Christine.

  3. That is a really cool sounding exercise - I will have to try it sometime!

  4. That sounds like a great excercise! I'll definitely try it out. I think originality is important, and I absolutely agree that an authentic voice will get you an original story. Great Post!


Thanks for your input!